Hurdy-Gurdy

HOME I St. Valery CD I St Valery Lyrics I All Songs I Bio's I Yew Tree I Hurdy-GurdyI News! I About Us I Our Music ISchedule IGuest Book I Photos I Fun Stuff! ILinksI Friends

 

A Hurdy-Gurdy was played by Felicia Dale on 3 Pints Gone's CD The Beaches of St. Valery

 

A Description of the Hurdy-Gurdy

BY Hurdy-Gurdy - Matthew Szostak

First of all, lets be clear: we are not referring to the organ grinder's barrel organ, which plays whatever tunes it has been "pre-programmed" to play, like a player piano or a music-box. This point of confusion exists only in English, the only language in the world which has devoted the same name to two quite different instruments. The association, however, is obvious, since both are played with a crank.

Our hurdy-gurdy (or vielle--roue in French) is a bowed stringed musical instrument. It usually has one or two melody strings, and two or more drone strings. Hurdy-gurdies come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, from traditional period designs almost a thousand years old, to modern "electro-acoustic" machines which challenge many traditional musical and visual aesthetics.

To describe the hurdy-gurdy is a challenge; one might call it a sort of mechanical violin. It is strapped to the midriff of the player, who can be seated or standing. Whereas a fiddler draws a bow across a violin's strings, a hurdy-gurdy player uses the right hand to turn a crank, which is attached via a metal shaft to a wheel (usually of wood) mounted within the instrument. As the wheel turns, its edge, which is coated with rosin, rubs against the strings causing them to vibrate: a continuous circular bow. This steady bowing action, when applied to the drone strings, helps create the hurdy-gurdy's bagpipe-like sound. The player's left hand, like that of the fiddler, produces the melody. Instead of pressing strings against a finger board, however, the fingers press sliding keys which cause the melody string(s) to be shortened and therefore to increase in pitch.

 Many hurdy-gurdies have a drone string which rests on a "loose-footed" bridge called a chien (in French), or "dog." Collectively called the trompette (or buzz-o-matic if you're RT), this arrangement can,when skillfully adjusted and played, create a buzzing rhythmic accompaniment unique to the hurdy-gurdy (now might be a good time to check out the sound samples).

 

 

    Click for Hurdy-Gurdy History by Astra Thor

HOME I St. Valery CD I St Valery Lyrics I All Songs I Bio's I Yew Tree I Hurdy-GurdyI News! I About Us I Our Music ISchedule IGuest Book I Photos I Fun Stuff! ILinksI Friends